Moorland Group:Altarnon, Davidstow, Laneast and St Clether

  •  

    A very warm Welcome to the website of 

    THE MOORLAND GROUP  

    of parishes

    situated on the

     northeastern edge of Bodmin Moor

    in Cornwall

     

    THE CHURCHES ARE

     

    ST. NONNA`S,  ALTARNUN with BOLVENTOR

    ST. SIDWELL AND ST GULVAL`S, LANEAST

    ST CLEDERUS`, ST CLETHER

    and

    ST. DAVID`S,  DAVIDSTOW

    Parish Priest: Reverend Deryn Roberts

    01566 880081

    stnonnas@gmail.com

     

     

     

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  • Rectory Ramblings

    How do you feel about birthdays? Do you like to celebrate them in style, with family and friends, or do you prefer something much more ‘low-key’ – a quiet meal with your ‘nearest and dearest’, for example? Or do you try to ignore them altogether, not needing to be reminded that another year has passed, and you’re another year older?

    There can be no doubt that, for many of us, our attitude to birthdays changes the older we get. I look at my grandchildren, aged between 3 and 8, looking forward to their birthdays with great anticipation and excitement, and I compare that with the lesser anticipation and excitement shown by their parents (and by me, if I’m honest!). Although I have noticed that the adults’ attitude changes slightly when they get near to clocking up another whole decade!

    And there’s one birthday, arguably the biggest birthday ever, which is always celebrated across the whole world. Christmas.

    The first Christmas presents we know about were those given by the Magi to the baby Jesus. Except that, depending on exactly when the star appeared in the sky, he was more likely to have been a toddler by the time they reached him. Did the star appear the instant Mary became pregnant, or not until the moment Jesus was born? We do not – nor will we ever - know. Either way, the Magi’s journey (mostly by night – the star wouldn’t have been easily visible in the day) must have taken about two years – by which time the Holy Family would have moved out of the stable and into more comfortable accommodation.

    Their gifts - gold, frankincense and myrrh - were standard gifts to honour a king or deity in the ancient world: gold as a precious metal, frankincense as perfume or incense, and myrrh as anointing oil. But in addition to the honour and status implied by the value of these gifts, scholars think that they were chosen for their special spiritual symbolism about Jesus himself - gold representing his kingship, frankincense a symbol of his priestly role, and myrrh a prefiguring of his death and embalming (as we hear in the carol ‘We Three Kings’)

    I think the presents we give each other also have special significance for us and for the people to whom we give them. Occasionally we may give someone else a present simply because they gave one to us, and we feel guilty if we don’t reciprocate, but mostly we give presents because we want to, because we care about the people to whom we are giving them. These gifts we usually choose carefully, hoping that they’ll not only bring pleasure and joy to the recipients, but also that they’ll carry our love to the people to whom we send them.

    A very happy and joy-filled Christmas to you all.

     

    Your priest and friend,

    Revd Deryn Roberts

    Rectory Ramblings

    How do you feel about birthdays? Do you like to celebrate them in style, with family and friends, or do you prefer something much more ‘low-key’ – a quiet meal with your ‘nearest and dearest’, for example? Or do you try to ignore them altogether, not needing to be reminded that another year has passed, and you’re another year older?

    There can be no doubt that, for many of us, our attitude to birthdays changes the older we get. I look at my grandchildren, aged between 3 and 8, looking forward to their birthdays with great anticipation and excitement, and I compare that with the lesser anticipation and excitement shown by their parents (and by me, if I’m honest!). Although I have noticed that the adults’ attitude changes slightly when they get near to clocking up another whole decade!

    And there’s one birthday, arguably the biggest birthday ever, which is always celebrated across the whole world. Christmas.

    The first Christmas presents we know about were those given by the Magi to the baby Jesus. Except that, depending on exactly when the star appeared in the sky, he was more likely to have been a toddler by the time they reached him. Did the star appear the instant Mary became pregnant, or not until the moment Jesus was born? We do not – nor will we ever - know. Either way, the Magi’s journey (mostly by night – the star wouldn’t have been easily visible in the day) must have taken about two years – by which time the Holy Family would have moved out of the stable and into more comfortable accommodation.

    Their gifts - gold, frankincense and myrrh - were standard gifts to honour a king or deity in the ancient world: gold as a precious metal, frankincense as perfume or incense, and myrrh as anointing oil. But in addition to the honour and status implied by the value of these gifts, scholars think that they were chosen for their special spiritual symbolism about Jesus himself - gold representing his kingship, frankincense a symbol of his priestly role, and myrrh a prefiguring of his death and embalming (as we hear in the carol ‘We Three Kings’)

    I think the presents we give each other also have special significance for us and for the people to whom we give them. Occasionally we may give someone else a present simply because they gave one to us, and we feel guilty if we don’t reciprocate, but mostly we give presents because we want to, because we care about the people to whom we are giving them. These gifts we usually choose carefully, hoping that they’ll not only bring pleasure and joy to the recipients, but also that they’ll carry our love to the people to whom we send them.

    A very happy and joy-filled Christmas to you all.

     

    Your priest and friend,

    Revd Deryn Roberts

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  • Daily Message

    dailyMessage